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Elizabethan Collar for Dogs

Elizabethan Collar for Dogs

Elizabethan collars are meant to ensure that dogs don't worsen their wounds by scratching or licking them, but critics argue that these collars do more harm than good to the animal.
DogAppy Staff
Last Updated: Sep 21, 2018
Dog with Elizabethan Collar
An Elizabethan collar or E-collar is given to animals that have recently undergone a surgery, sustained injury, or had stitches that require some time to heal, in order to ensure that they don't lick, bite, or scratch the affected area out of irritation.
Often referred to as the Cone of Shame, due to its cone or night lamp-like structure, the E-collar is put around the necks of animals purely for medical reasons. It is very important to choose and use this collar correctly; it should not be a barrier for the pet's eyesight or feeding habits.
How to Choose an Elizabethan Collar?
You need to understand that Elizabethan collars meant for dogs are totally different from the ones for cats or other pet animals for that matter. Hence, you need to make sure that you buy the correctly fitting collar for your pet.
Elizabethan Collar
E-collars that are available in the market come with adjustable settings and sizes ranging from 7.5 cm to 40 cm. Some collar manufacturers sell these collars in clothing sizes, like small, medium, large, extra large, and king size.
You need to get well-versed with the right way to tie the collar to your pet. Always remember that the smaller part of the collar should be at the inner side (around the neck). The plastic loop of the collar should be kept away from the dog's neck.
Dog wearing a collar
Lastly, you need to make sure that the collar is firm, but not too tight, or else it will interfere with your pet's feeding. If you have any doubt pertaining to the use of this collar, you should immediately consult a vet.
Alternatives
No matter how useful they are, pets surely don't enjoy this collar around their neck. Some pets may tolerate these collars initially, but in the end, they start rebelling by refusing to eat and drink. Keeping this in mind, people have started using temporary alternatives like small pairs of pants and shorts for their dogs.
Many people now prefer collars that are made of paper-like materials over hard E-collars. Yet another alternative is to opt for banded/inflatable collars that act as neck braces. These collars do not restrict the movement of the dog's head.
Some dog owners, especially those with stubborn pets who get rid of the Elizabethan collar every time it's put on them, have now started using neoprene body suits to cover their wounds.
On a parting note, you should consult a vet in order to find the right kind of collar for your beloved pet!